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Who Shall I Say Is Calling

Remembering Leonard Cohen again on Yom Kippur.
Cohen was the sexy, late-blooming gloom-monger among a small, elite coterie of singer-songwriters who came to define the Sixties and early Seventies. His rumbling voice, Spanish-y guitar lines and deeply poetic lyrics transubstantiated the sacred into the profane and vice versa. While early songs like “Suzanne,” “Sisters of Mercy” and “Bird on a Wire” made him a college-dorm fixture, later masterpieces like “Everybody Knows,” “I’m Your Man” and “The Future” introduced him to a new generation of post-punks and fellow travelers. Below with Sonny Rollins on sax.

The solemn, strings-accompanied centerpiece of New Skin for the Old Ceremony is based on a melody for the Hebrew prayer “Unetanneh Tokef,” chanted on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, when the Book of Life is opened to reveal who will die and by what means. In his version Cohen conceives his own litany of “the ways you can leave this vale of tears,” which include downers, avalanche and “something blunt,” ending each verse with the agnostic query, “and who shall I say is calling?”  Haunting lyrics below.
And who by fire, who by water,
Who in the sunshine, who in the night time,
Who by high ordeal, who by common trial,
Who in your merry merry month of may,
Who by very slow decay,
And who shall I say is calling?
And who in her lonely slip, who by barbiturate,
Who in these realms of love, who by something blunt,
And who by avalanche, who by powder,
Who for his greed, who for his hunger,
And who shall I say is calling?
And who by brave assent, who by accident,
Who in solitude, who in this mirror,
Who by his lady’s command, who by his own hand,
Who in mortal chains, who in power,
And who shall I say is calling?